Cherry MY - What's up with the hate?

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off

01 Jul 2012, 14:52

kint wrote:My MY switches were mounted with little pushpins in a 3 legs base - 2 of those on each switch.
Also I didn't find any metal rivets in my MY board.
Mine is basically what Peter has, just with different doubleshots (to be precise, actually lacking any caps and springs at the moment; springs for test (fail), caps repurposed (win)); but I'm not getting what you mean by the quoted first sentence...
Mine (and Peter's) have a flat square base, with two protruding plastic pins, one on each opposite corner, and those pins go through the plate/membrane sandwhich, on the back they are molten into flat 'chips' that extrude wider than the hole they came through, hence fastening the switches to the board as such.
Also, at least these old ones, are open-able from the top with just two flathead screwdrivers.

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kint

01 Jul 2012, 15:24

Mine (and Peter's) have a flat square base, with two protruding plastic pins, one on each opposite corner, and those pins go through the plate/membrane sandwhich, on the back they are molten into flat 'chips' that extrude wider than the hole they came through, hence fastening the switches to the board as such.
Also, at least these old ones, are open-able from the top with just two flathead screwdrivers.
here's what I tried to say.
Your MYs seem to be permanently fixed to the plate because of the little stems molten. Newer/ my MYs are detachable from the plate.
The red sentence goes as well for the newer ones, the blue one differs. Instead each of your "pins" split in three parts. From the upper side there is a tiny pushpin injecting in the middle of these three parts, spreading them hence fastening the switch.
mind Intel Cpu Socket 775 cooler mount if that helps (or google that).
Pushing the pushpins up from the underside, through the plate, the 3 little spreading feet of the switch mount will be despread, and the whole switch can be untaken from the plate (if done on the two opposing corners of course)

User avatar
off

01 Jul 2012, 15:31

kint wrote:Pushing the pushpins up from the underside, through the plate, the 3 little spreading feet of the switch mount will be despread, and the whole switch can be untaken from the plate (if done on the two opposing corners of course)
Gotcha, pushpins alright. Are those newer switches still disassemblablable from the top while attached?

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kint

01 Jul 2012, 15:37

off wrote: ...disassemblablable ...
:lol:
haven't tried. They are
off wrote: ...disassemblablable ...
when demounted. Not as easy as MX though you have to stick tiny things between the hatches of the stem and the switches casing from the upper side of the switch. Maybe that works when still mounted, maybe not, maybe you'll damage the foils when protruding too much hope that helps.

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off

01 Jul 2012, 15:50

kint wrote:
regarding this off wrote: ...disassemblablably ...
Not as easy as MX though you have to stick tiny things between the hatches of the stem and the switches casing from the upper side of the switch.
Old MYs are easier to dissassemble than MXs at least, just two flat screwdrivers straight down from the top on the only opposite sides that have slots, and while pointing them inwards pull up to pop the top and reach the spring. Like so:
cherry MY old switch disassembly.jpg
cherry MY old switch disassembly.jpg (4.79 KiB) Viewed 1277 times
Also, Urbanus, very cool to hear a contrasting opinion, someone that actually likes (prefers even?) the (old) MY switches for typing over the MXs, if i got that correctly (FTSC being oldMY)! Feel free to elaborate more, this is the first time I've heard that.
I do concur that, at least theoretically, the force slope of MYs seems ideal, 'forces' one to avoid bottoming out, while still making sure you have a slope/point of reference to judge the activation point by; in practice though I hated their guts.
And yet they still seem like the closest switch matching a theory of mine regarding an imho ideal typing switch.. hope to feel more similar ones as time passes.

User avatar
kint

01 Jul 2012, 16:12

yeah like so. Still I found it being uncomfy maybe just because I was used to the MX method.

edit: because of that fiddling of the screwdrivers into the housing that is.
Last edited by kint on 01 Jul 2012, 17:27, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
off

01 Jul 2012, 17:23

Well the pushing inwards basically requires two hands, while an MX requires only one since that's pushing outwards; so you do have a point there.

woody
Count Troller

01 Jul 2012, 19:04

Curiosity is curiosity - I should try MY after all.

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Icarium

02 Jul 2012, 22:17

What does FTSC mean?

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robin13867

03 Jul 2012, 09:08

Icarium wrote:What does FTSC mean?
Full
Travel
Sealed
Contact

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urbanus

03 Jul 2012, 12:12

off wrote:Also, Urbanus, very cool to hear a contrasting opinion, someone that actually likes (prefers even?) the (old) MY switches for typing over the MXs, if i got that correctly (FTSC being oldMY)! Feel free to elaborate more, this is the first time I've heard that.
I'd just like to clarify that my MY boards are of recent manufacture. I've got a G81-3000 and two G81-1800. "FTSC" is Cherry's acronym for the keyswitch technology used in their MY series of boards.
off wrote:I do concur that, at least theoretically, the force slope of MYs seems ideal, 'forces' one to avoid bottoming out, while still making sure you have a slope/point of reference to judge the activation point by; in practice though I hated their guts.
And yet they still seem like the closest switch matching a theory of mine regarding an imho ideal typing switch.. hope to feel more similar ones as time passes.
After three days of use, I hated my G81-3000 and was ready to give it up; but I figured I should give it at least a week.

After a week, I wasn't sure whether I loved it or hated it.

After two weeks, I was getting more fluent but still had problems with key misses. Nonetheless, my typing speed was faster than on any other keyswitch I had at hand (MX blue, MX red, buckling spring, Realforce).

After three or four weeks I was pretty fluent.

Maybe it's too much to expect people to spend weeks getting used to a keyswitch technology. I don't judge. I would say that there's nothing intrinsically wrong with FTSC -- it's a great switch! It just seems to give most people a very poor first impression.

User avatar
off

03 Jul 2012, 16:56

ofcourse... after having fully demolished my MY board a proponent pops up and vocalizes the beauty of the switch for touchtyping. :'(
The caps, cable and case have all got new homes, and all the springs are stored away. So I'm guessing it'll be quite a while before I ever get to try them in a proper, dedicated, fashion. Still appreciated nonetheless!

I only tried them for a day or three before I jumped back to my then-halfdecent at101, even preferred a separate-stemmed-rubber-dome to that MY board at the time, but as I said; it appears I gave up too quickly.

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Icarium

03 Jul 2012, 19:28

Getting MY boards really shouldn't be an issue. :)

User avatar
off

05 Jul 2012, 12:54

Oh but it is. Mentally! ;)

486

06 Jul 2012, 00:18

Icarium wrote:Getting MY boards really shouldn't be an issue. :)
easy to find. Usually under the G81 catagory.
Well, i got a NIB MY for about $20 two years ago. I mostly bought it for the card and fingerprint scanner. MY IMHO is okay for POS but not for typing.

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