Razer (pre-2009) mice

zts

12 Apr 2015, 02:07

going through my files piles ... some of older (pre-2009) Razer mice and my notes on them at the time. It was possibly Razer's golden age.
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Diamondback 3G
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Sensor Type:
LED; 3G infrared sensor

DPI/CPI:
1800 (drivers set: 800, 1800)

Hand: Ambi

Hold:
Fingers
Palm: small to medium size hand

Player Sens:
- Low: Excellent
- Mid: Excellent
- High: Very Good (not recommended for extremely large screens running at the highest rez)

Buttons: 7

Note 1:
Probably the best DPI setting is 1800 and lower the sensitivity to your preference

Note 2:
Same sensor used in: DeathAdder; Boomslang CE 2007

Note 3:
Hidusbf hack: Yes (use it at your own risk to change the polling rate to 500 or 1000 Hz and bypass the 125 Hz limitation)

Strengths:
- Absolute tracking accuracy
- Close to “0” problems on wide variety of systems
- Highly reliable
- Very minimal lift-off distance for low sens gamers

Weakness:
- Side buttons not ideally positioned
- Fixed polling rate at 125 Hz (see Note 3)
- Software-capped from its full capabilities
- Unimpressive sides’ glow pipe (except the wheel)

Commentary:
This is a kick-ass mouse for any FPS player that strongly favors more of the “classic” Razer shell shape. The 3G version is a perfect replacement for the still great but aging Diamondback “classic”. Although lower priced than many of Razer mice, Diamondback 3G could easily be the best gaming mouse available. Large-hand palm players should consider DeathAdder instead of Diamondback 3G.



Diamondback
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Sensor Type:
LED; 2G optical (see Note 2)

DPI/CPI:
1600 (drivers set: 800, 1600)

Hand: Ambi

Hold:
Fingers
Palm: small to medium size hand

Player Sens:
- Low: Very Good
- Mid: Excellent
- High: Good (not recommended for extremely large screens running at the highest rez)

Buttons: 7

Note 1:
Probably the best DPI setting is 1600 and lower the sensitivity to your preference

Note 2:
Diamondback Plasma Limited Edtion Sensor: LED; 2G infrared sensor

Note 3:
Hidusbf hack: Yes (use it at your own risk to change the polling rate to 500 or 1000 Hz and bypass the 125 Hz limitation)

Note 4:
While you can install many different Razer mice on the same system with no problems, installing Diamondback and Diamondback 3G on the same system creates some (non critical) problems. However, you can run one of these mice with no Razer drivers to avoid confusing the system

Strengths:
- Excellent tracking accuracy
- Highly reliable
- Looks and performance that instantly gained a large fan base and revitalized Razer
- Product continuation with Diamondback 3G

Weakness:
- Side buttons not ideally positioned
- Fixed polling rate at 125 Hz (see Note 3)
- Moderately high lift-off distance for low sens gamers
- Inability to disable Razer tray icon from loading on startup

Commentary:
One of the greatest gaming mice ever and battle-tested in almost every pro competition. Consider the 3G version for even a better performance. Diamondback can use Razer Pro|Click V1.6 mouse Mac OS X drivers if you want to have more control over Diamondback on Mac OS X Tiger and Leopard (10.4 and 10.5).



Krait
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Sensor Type:
LED; 2G infrared sensor

DPI/CPI: 1600 (drivers set: 400, 1600)

Hand: Ambi

Hold:
Fingers
Palm: small size hand

Player Sens:
- Low: Very Good
- Mid: Excellent
- High: Good (not recommended for extremely large screens running at the highest rez)

Buttons: 3

Note 1:
Probably the best DPI setting is 1600 and lower the sensitivity to your preference

Note 2:
Same sensor used in: Diamondback Plasma Limited Edtion
Same shell used in: Almost identical to the retired Razer Viper

Note 3:
Hidusbf hack: Yes (use it at your own risk to change the polling rate to 500 or 1000 Hz and bypass the 125 Hz limitation)

Strengths:
- Great tracking accuracy
- Close to “0” problems on wide variety of systems
- Highly reliable
- No side buttons (consider this a weakness if you want extra buttons)

Weakness:
- Fixed polling rate at 125 Hz (see Note 3)
- Teflon feet may be too thin
- Rather high lift-off distance for low sens gamers
- Unimpressive sides’ glow pipe (except the wheel)

Commentary:
The cheapest of Razer mice, but nevertheless a frequent choice of the top pro-gamers who require design simplicity and performance. Although launched by the Razer Marketing as an RTS and MMORPG specialized mouse, the mouse is actually a much better choice for an FPS gamer who considers the usual extra side buttons more of an obstacle rather than help in the gaming arena. Stay away from Krait if you are a medium to large-handed palm user.



Copperhead
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Sensor Type:
LASER; 1G

DPI/CPI: 2000 (drivers set: 400, 800, 1600, 2000)

Hand: Ambi

Hold:
Fingers
Palm: small to medium size hand

Player Sens:
- Low: Fair
- Mid: Very Good
- High: Very Good

Buttons: 7

Note 1:
Not recommended for low sens gamers

Note 2:
Same sensor used in: An improved version of this sensor used in Razer/MS Habu
Same shell used in: Obviously very similar but not identical to Diamondback

Note 3:
Polling rate switch: Yes (125, 500, 1000 Hz)

Strengths:
- Recognizable Razer design
- First LASER mouse ever
- Impressive glow effect and a great looking mouse

Weakness:
- Weaknesses associated with being the first using the LASER
- Weaknesses associated with the LASER’s skip-prone properties
- Conflicts with some MOBOs
- Mostly unusable for low sens gamers due to the skips at high speed swipes

Commentary:
To tell the truth from the low sens gamer perspective is that Copperhead could be considered the worst performing mouse Razer has currently on the market, but also at the same time the truth is that Copperhead is one of the most loved mice Razer ever produced measured by the overwhelmingly positive reactions of those high sens twitch gamers. There is something about this mouse that goes beyond its significant performance flaws and captivates the user.



Habu (aka. MS Habu)
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Sensor Type:
LASER; 1G

DPI/CPI: 2000 (drivers set: 400, 800, 1600, 2000)

Hand: Right hand

Hold:
Palm: medium to large size hand

Player Sens:
- Low: Fair
- Mid: Very Good
- High: Very Good

Buttons: 7

Note 1:
Probably the best DPI setting is 1600 and lower the sensitivity to your preference

Note 2:
Same sensor used in: Improved Copperhead sensor
Same shell used in: Almost identical to DeathAdder

Note 3:
Polling rate switch: Yes (125, 500, 1000 Hz)

Strengths:
- DPI switch buttons
- Impressive glow effect
- Much improved side buttons position

Weakness:
- Mostly unusable for low sens gamers due to the skips at high speed swipes
- Most weaknesses from Copperhead are in Habu too

Commentary:
You could call this mouse a “Cooperhead in IntelliMouse Explorer 3 Shell” and you won’t be wrong by much. Habu’s somewhat improved Copperhead sensor does offer a slightly better performance compared to Copperhead, but this mouse is mostly about attracting new customers who want that IntelliMouse Explorer 3 shape and feel and abhore the usual Razer mice design (Viper, Diamondback, Copperhead).



DeathAdder
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Sensor Type:
LED; 3G infrared sensor

DPI/CPI: 1800 (drivers set: 450, 900, 1800)

Hand: Right hand

Hold:
Palm: medium to large size hand

Player Sens:
- Low: Excellent
- Mid: Excellent
- High: Very Good

Buttons: 5

Note 1:
Probably the best DPI setting is 1800 and lower the sensitivity to your preference

Note 2:
Same sensor used in: Diamondback 3G and Boomslang CE 2007
Same shell used in: Almost identical to Habu

Note 3:
Polling rate switch: Yes (125, 500, 1000 Hz)

Strengths:
- Absolute tracking accuracy
- Highly reliable
- Great looks

Weakness:
- In some early batches the mouse seems to scrape against the pad
- Early compatibility problems with some motherboards
- Unimpressive sides’ glow pipe (except the wheel)

Commentary:
For the FPS fans who love MS IntelliMouse Explorer 3 shape it doesn’t get better than DeathAdder. This mouse simply sells itself and is a frequent choice of the palm-hold pro gamers.



Boomslang CE 2007
boomslang.jpg
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Sensor Type:
LED; 3G infrared sensor

DPI/CPI: 1800 (drivers set: 400, 800, 1800)

Hand: Ambi

Hold:
Fingers
Palm: medium to large size hand

Player Sens:
- Low: Excellent
- Mid: Excellent
- High: Very Good

Buttons: 5

Note 1:
Probably the best DPI setting is 1800 and lower the sensitivity to your preference

Note 2:
Same sensor used in: Diamondback 3G and DeathAdder

Note 3:
Polling rate switch: Yes (125, 500, 1000 Hz)

Strengths:
- Absolute tracking accuracy
- Close to “0” problems on wide variety of systems
- Highly reliable
- Collectors item

Weakness:
- Questionable quality of scroll wheel
- Pipe light penetrates through sides’ joints
- Side buttons may be in the way when lifting the mouse for some users

Commentary:
This is a collector’s item, but of course, you can still play with it. In general, this mouse favors somewhat larger hand and some time to adjust to the shape. You can expect the sensor performance to be identical to DeathAdder and Diamondback 3G, but take your time to adjust your mouse movement to the more rear position of the sensor -- less wrist and more arm movement and you may end up feeling that this mouse is even more precise than the DA or DB3G.

Note: 10,000 of these were made; although of an average built quality, on eBay for a sealed NIBs the price is still pretty high (as of Apr. 2015)from around $250 to $450 -- some lower production numbers will probably get even higher price (00345/10000 vs. 9865/10000). You should be able to see this number through the outer plastic wrap (for a trully sealed NIB).



Lachesis
lachesis.jpg
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Sensor Type:
LASER; 3G

DPI/CPI: 4000 (drivers set: custom in 125 DPI increments)

Hand: Ambi

Hold:
Fingers
Palm: medium size hand

Player Sens:
- Low: Very Good
- Mid: Very Good
- High: Very Good

Buttons: 9

Note 1:
Some users experience jumps and axis locks -- look for v.1.64 or later version of Lachesis firmware to correct the problem

Note 2:
The sensor used is maybe a short-term departure from Razer's familiarity with Avago/Agilent sensors into somewhat unknown Philips sensors’ territory. Initial release problems noted and significant

Note 3:
Polling rate switch: Yes (125, 500, 1000 Hz)

Strengths:
- DPI switch buttons
- Can store up to 25 different profiles -- 5 in each of 5 profiles
- Customizable DPI switching in 125 DPI increments
- Very cool design
- Much improved side buttons position

Weakness:
- Initial firmware problems -- jumps, axis locks
- Some user won’t have enough grip on this mouse

Commentary:
Razer skipped the 2G LASER and went directly to the 3G. While being extremely familiar with a wide variety of Avago (aka HP, aka Agilent) sensors, the Philips Twin-Eye LASER sensor proved to be a challenge for Razer to set it right. Looking at this mouse, there is a generic resemblance to Boomslang but in a modernized shell and with a LASER sensor.

User avatar
Mal-2

12 Apr 2015, 06:41

zts wrote: DeathAdder
Weakness:
- In some early batches the mouse seems to scrape against the pad
- Early compatibility problems with some motherboards
- Unimpressive sides’ glow pipe (except the wheel)
- Excessively heavy, and it's not due to removable weights. It's also oddly balanced, being somewhat top-heavy due to the upper circuit board.
- Shite build quality: the scroll wheel on mine had an axle with a stem too small for the rotary encoder, allowing it to spin without engaging after just three months of wear.
- Shite repairability: Survived being disassembled (due to the above mentioned problem) four times only before the ribbon cable broke at the lower circuit board.
- Excessive bling: Could not turn off the "bling" LED without loading the driver. (You should need the driver to turn ON the shiny, not to turn OFF the shiny.)

Sorry, poorest performance per dollar of any mouse I've ever owned, and I've owned quite a few. Except for having poor sliding pads that make for quite audible scraping in use, my less than $5 (shipped!) generic Chinese mouse is designed better. I've had it open, and although the build quality is still pretty mediocre, there are no points of failure to worry about like a ribbon cable connecting the two shell halves. Will never buy Razer again.

zts

12 Apr 2015, 07:51

^ From the very start Razer had huge issues in quality consistency ... the same mouse is a piece of crap to some and then a god-send gemstone for others. I had to replace DeathAdder twice, Lachesis 3 times till the product performed "adequately" (read: I got tired of complaining to Razer). Eventually, I did resolve things on my own.

The second issue with Razer -- company's deniability of problems is rampant. Maybe that improved lately, I'm not sure.

The third issue -- no matter how much you pay for Razer mice, they always have somewhat cheap feel. I'm thinking that is a result of Razer insisting on some very light materials. But there is also some built quality issues.

Otherwise, the last time I used Razer mouse was around early 2012 ... Imperator, which is a pretty good mouse. The other one that I used often was Salmosa (that for some reason I didn't list in the original post). I used to swing between Logitech and Razer, but last 2 to 3 years it's been Logitech only (mostly due to Razer software issues). Will probably try another Razer soon without its Synapse hog -- in general, I do prefer mice that don't require any additional software.

User avatar
Mal-2

13 Apr 2015, 01:25

Oh I forgot one: thumb buttons positioned so low it's impossible to pick up the mouse to reposition it without hitting one or both. They were so light to activate I was constantly setting them off mistakenly. The cheap mouse I have now has them positioned just a few millimeters higher, and just slightly harder to press -- a nice alteration on both counts.

Herpderp

04 May 2015, 22:31

Shame they dumped all these old shapes, I would love to try a Krait, it looks like it could be "the mouse" for me.

andrewjoy

04 May 2015, 22:49

Mal-2 wrote:
zts wrote: DeathAdder
- Shite repairability: Survived being disassembled (due to the above mentioned problem) four times only before the ribbon cable broke at the lower circuit board.

Exact same thing happend to mine

EDIT

I also prefer the older dimondback over the 3g :) need to find me one again one day

User avatar
derzemel

05 May 2015, 06:30

Oh, the Diamondback... the most reliable mouse I had. It worked like a champ for 6 years

zts

13 May 2015, 09:35

After some 3 years, finally trying another Razer -- Taipan. Incredibly high 8200 dpi. Not bad -- it seems the tracking is tremendously improved by adding the second sensor ... or as Razer puts it:
... the most advanced gaming mouse sensor ever developed – the 4G Dual Sensor System. It uses both an optical and a laser sensor to enhance the mouse’s ability to determine actual on-surface tracking. This means greater control for the gamer as the sensor only detects intended or “true movement” which is then rapidly translated in-game. The Dual Sensor system is capable of detecting true 6400 or 8200 DPI, where the sensor reads each and every dot instead of software enhanced interpolated DPI in that of other mice. This ensures maximum precision and accuracy for your gameplay.
As I said, it's good stuff on paper but I usually use anywhere between 800 and 2000 dpi, so am not sure if I'll see any benefits, but so far so good for my needs. True, the mouse doesn't skip any longer as previous LASER versions did. Anyways, paid $7 or 8 more for the white version (with white glow):
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User avatar
\/\/oll3

15 May 2015, 12:40

zts wrote: ...
The 2nd Sensor was only there for calibration and lift off, and as you should be able to see, it later got scrapped because there are no benefits in combination with S9818 or 9819, even the latest PTE Generation doesnt need it for lift off and unintentional movement.

True 8200cpi isnt quite true as well because 9800´s hardware is only capable of 6400cpi Hardware CPI.

jaunkst

29 Oct 2015, 12:59

I had bought the first boomslang, it came in a round metal tin. I remember crushing my peers at lAN parties. That summer I was off at summer camp and a bird had flown through my window pooped all over my bedroom and ate the rubber off of my boomslang. I was furious. Wish I knew what I did with it.

User avatar
stratokaster

29 Oct 2015, 20:14

I loved my DeathAdder because it's difficult for me to find mice that fit my large hands well. But I agree that its build quality is somewhat shoddy at best. Oh, and it died after just 4 months of use.

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