What's your favorite mouse for CAD work?

N8N

20 Oct 2011, 01:20

I need a new mouse... mine is dead and I'm using a crappy OEM Dell thing in its place. It's pissing me off. I prefer cordless; I have large hands; I don't really need any fancy bells and whistles but if I have to get them to get a good, large cordless mouse I will put up with them. Let me know what you're using!

My dead mouse, which I really liked, was a Logitech something or other (no model ID evident) which was a pretty basic cordless thing with a scroll wheel. The scroll wheel also worked as a button and would scroll side to side if you pushed it one way or the other. I really had no complaints with it other than that I wished that it were bigger. Why is it that cordless mice seemed to be made extra small and aimed at mobile use? I really hate the cord even in a desktop environment; the drag and resistance to flexing really messes me up when I'm trying to knock something out quickly.

Alternately, if anyone can recommend a good corded mouse that comes with a light, "limp" cord that would otherwise meet my criteria, I'd consider that.

I live in the US, and don't have any stores that sell anything that in any way tempts me, nor do the stores around me really allow you to try before you buy, hence my post. Any help is appreciated!

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didja

08 Jun 2012, 09:22

Most trackball die hards that I've met swear by them for CAD use. That's why discontinued Microsoft Trackballs are so expensive, people use them to make a living so a few hundred for a mint one is feasible.

For a mouse I like the Logitech G9X. Mine is corded but there are probably cordless comparable models.
Adjustable DPI could be useful going in and out of autocad. YMMV
Changeable shells for different shapes/sizes. They also have weights you can add internally.

If you're motivated, you can use bondo to reshape any mouse that has features you like to a complete custom fit to your hand. Yes, I'm serious. This is a different sort of mod but gives you the idea.

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itlnstln

08 Jun 2012, 13:33

didja wrote:If you're motivated, you can use bondo to reshape any mouse that has features you like to a complete custom fit to your hand. Yes, I'm serious.
There was one guy on GH (a long time ago) that would take the guts out of mice and trackballs and implant them into new trackball "shells" made of Bondo or clay or something.* That was a little extreme, but totally do-able.

*They were kinda ugly-looking, but he was building them for feel not looks.

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off

08 Jun 2012, 13:48

itlnstln wrote:implant them into new trackball "shells" made of Bondo or clay or something.*
I'm still curious what would be the perfect (yet cheap) material for that, seeing how half the stuff seems either hard to get, iritating to the skin, susceptible to cracking/sweat/bodyfat or plain uncomfortable to hold or mold..

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didja

12 Jun 2012, 03:57

Bondo holds up just fine to sweat on hands and you dont' even need to paint it. Ask any olympic archer or rifle shooter.

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002
Topre Enthusiast

12 Jun 2012, 04:41

I wonder if sugru would be an OK solution?

http://sugru.com/

Findecanor

12 Jun 2012, 05:18

While Bondo, and other polyester-based auto body fillers, is cheap and readily available, it smells ... even after it has set. Sanding dust is also toxic, and not nice to inhale. The fumes and dust cause brain damage (the first symptom being a headache, and the second symptom being that you no longer get a headache when working with it ...)
You will also easily get bubbles when working with thick pieces and I think that it is often too sticky and often sets too fast.

I recommend an epoxy-based putty such as Milliput, instead. Before it has cured, it has the consistency of modeling clay, albeit somewhat hard modeling clay. You can sculpt tiny, precise details in Milliput, which you can't do with Bondo. It takes at least six hours to cure, giving you time to work with it. Within that time, it softens with water, which is a property that can be utilized for smoothing a surface or for imprinting a texture or pattern using a rubber stamp. The solubility also helps when cleaning up spills, and when cleaning sculpting tools and your hands. Hardened epoxy also has better adhesion to ABS than polyester.
Milliput does not smell very much, but it can be an irritant to some. It is recommended that you use gloves, but I have noticed no ill effects.

I still use Bondo for many things, such as when I need to smear putty over large areas, but for sculpting, I use Milliput.
Last edited by Findecanor on 12 Jun 2012, 05:21, edited 1 time in total.

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didja

12 Jun 2012, 05:20

Edit: haha, we cross posted about the same thing... here's what I was posting but you beat me:

Yes it would work but it's too expensive per ounce. Bondo is quite cheap.

Another good option is epoxy putty. It's more expensive than bondo but much less than sugru (I think)
You cut off an amount, knead the center and outer parts together, mold it into whatever shape you want and it stays that way. Holds up very well to hand sweat.

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didja

12 Jun 2012, 05:37

Here's a bow grip I used epoxy putty on and it held up perfectly. This was an experiment that was successful, I redid it later with much better results.

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Maarten

12 Jun 2012, 10:46

For 2D CAD work im not very picky when it comes to mice, i usually bring the mouse i use at home (i do dislike switching back and forth between different mice all the time). For 3D stuff i prefer the Space Pilot Pro tho its not technically a mouse but more something you use in conjunction with one....

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Ascaii
The Beard

17 Jun 2012, 08:58

Ive got two mice I enjoy using for CAD modeling...first, the 2d and low effort solution:
Cherry Gentix Mouse - cheap, light, simple. I'm more of a claw gripper and I love the shape and rubber grips on the mouse...ive got three of these, one with my laptop, one on my cad-box and one in reserve...
For larger projects and 3d modeling I catch myself going back to my old Logitech trackman more often then not.

SeNte

18 Jun 2012, 14:33

Ascaii wrote:Ive got two mice I enjoy using for CAD modeling...first, the 2d and low effort solution:
Cherry Gentix Mouse - cheap, light, simple. I'm more of a claw gripper and I love the shape and rubber grips on the mouse...ive got three of these, one with my laptop, one on my cad-box and one in reserve...
For larger projects and 3d modeling I catch myself going back to my old Logitech trackman more often then not.
Can you tell us wich sensor is it using? Does it have acceleration?
I really like the shape of the mouse but I'm affraid cursor quality it's bad.

Also, would be really nice to have some paint tests.

:)

pondscum

01 Jul 2012, 15:20

Is this in addition to a 3D controller?

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Ascaii
The Beard

14 Jul 2012, 12:47

Hmm, not sure actually, but Ive got a defective one I was going to open up to check out the sensor. Ill post more info on it later. What kind of tests were you thinking of? Worst case I can recommend just getting one, since they are less then 10$.

Sensor datasheet attached.
Attachments
AV02-1655EN+DS+ADNS-5700+01Nov2011.pdf
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Last edited by Ascaii on 15 Jul 2012, 08:29, edited 1 time in total.

richie

14 Jul 2012, 13:29

I'm using a wacom intuos 4 right now for cad/maya work and finding it really comfortable, give it a go.
Gave the 3d controller a go at work but didn't like the lack of short cut keys so the speed gain was lost because since I was always reaching back to the keyboard short cut keys!

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Icarium

14 Jul 2012, 14:39

What kind of 3D controller? One of those 3D mice that are basically huge trackpoints which you can push and pull?

richie

14 Jul 2012, 14:45

yeh should have mentions which controller :oops:
the 3Dconnexion SpacePilot PRO
http://www.3dconnexion.com/products/spacepilot-pro.html

Look like this new version has a whole lot more shortcut keys than the version I've tried.

The_Beast

14 Jul 2012, 15:29

Maarten wrote:For 2D CAD work im not very picky when it comes to mice, i usually bring the mouse i use at home (i do dislike switching back and forth between different mice all the time). For 3D stuff i prefer the Space Pilot Pro tho its not technically a mouse but more something you use in conjunction with one....
Same here

net2522

14 Jul 2012, 15:50

The_Beast wrote:
Maarten wrote:For 2D CAD work im not very picky when it comes to mice, i usually bring the mouse i use at home (i do dislike switching back and forth between different mice all the time). For 3D stuff i prefer the Space Pilot Pro tho its not technically a mouse but more something you use in conjunction with one....
Same here
Is that the iDrive on BMW??

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Ascaii
The Beard

15 Jul 2012, 09:24

sensor datasheet added to my old post.

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