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Re: Learning on a cheap keyboard?

Posted: 03 Jun 2019, 21:49
by SneakyRobb
rockyglock wrote:
03 Jun 2019, 20:58
I've always wanted to learn keys/piano but I come from a working class family so my options have been really limited. When I was an older kid I had a keyboard but I accidentally stepped on it and it broke (lol). Any instrument I get is usually from a pawn shop. Currently I have a Yamaha PSR-11 with a couple squint keys, but I want to learn anyway. I've been learning guitar but have always struggled to learn what note is assigned to what fret and don't have much knowledge of music theory or how chords work. I figured it would be much easier to learn theory on a piano than a guitar simply due to the straight forward layout, then I could transfer that knowledge to the guitar once I have a better grasp of it. I have autism and really struggle to do things backwards or mirrored due to a really bad spatial IQ. Any tips for this would be great (e.g ABCDEFG|GFEDCBA.... the latter is very hard for me to get to grasps with Maybe i just need to memorize it?.)
Hi,

In general I agree with your theory. I have found learning music theory much more difficult on guitar than the piano. While it can be done on guitar, it is much easier to have all your keys and fingers in front of you seeing what note they are pressing on what section.

Contrast this with guitar where it is much harder to look at notes on sheet music. If you look up how to play most songs on guitar they are often in tab format. This is great for early technical learning but very bad form if you want to actually learn music. I have played guitar for years and still mostly use tabs and to this day cannot figure out how to play guitar in a more "musical way."

Contrast with piano where basically all players learn to play from sheet music, and stick to sheet music. This is a much better practice. The guitar is by no means an unmusical instrument, but the piano will afford you a much more musical experience especially with the theory. At the same time despite being so simple to start, the piano still affords an extremely rich and wide array of sounds. There is great subtlety in the how you can play just one key, loud soft, with more reverberance, shorter etc.

Another advantage of the piano is that you basically hit the one key, and it makes the noise. With guitar you have to have multiple fingers aligned all at once before making any noise.

I don't have any specific keyboard recommendations, but if I went back in time and had to choose which instrument I put more effort into when I was young, I would trade almost all the guitar effort for piano