Commodore PC-5/PC-10 keyboard

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Commodore PC-5/PC-10 keyboard
DSC01372.JPG
Branding Commodore
Manufacturer Cherry, NMB
Features NKRO
Layouts 86 key US
Keyswitches Cherry MX, Hi-Tek Series 725
Interface XT

PC-5 and PC-10 were personal computers from Commodore made in the 1980s. The PC-5 keyboard was also used for early PC-10 batches, before being replaced with the revised PC-10 keyboard.[Citation needed]

The keyboards for these computers have Commodore's alternative colour scheme where the peripheral keys are lighter instead of darker shade of grey than the central keys. This arrangement can also be seen in the Commodore KPQ-E99YC keyboard and the Commodore Amiga 2000 keyboard.

These keyboards were made by both Cherry and NMB.

Cherry version

Cherry produced keyboards for the Commodore PC-5 and PC-10 home computers under several article numbers in the mid 1980s.

The space bar is 10 units wide. There is one centre key mount and 2 additional stabiliser mounts, 3.5 units left and right of the centre. The stabilisers are Cherry PCB mounted but with screws fastening them instead of the more modern plastic clip on variants.

The keyboard features "vintage" Cherry MX Black switches, with diodes on all switches for full N-key rollover. There is a red LED under both caps lock and num lock. As is traditional with Cherry MX keyboards, the space bar uses a different switch; here it is Cherry MX Linear Grey with a much more pale appearance than modern MX Linear Greys.

Disassembly

Just turn it around and remove 8 screws.

Gallery

Known variants

  • G80-0499HAU (US-layout, PCB-mounted MX Blacks)
  • G80-0530 (DE layout, PCB-mounted MX Blacks)
  • G80-0531 (UK layout, PCB-mounted MX Blacks)
  • G80-0532 (IT layout, PCB-mounted MX Blacks)
  • G80-0559 (Danish layout with additional ANSI legends on some keys, PCB-mounted MX Blacks)

NMB version

The NMB version uses Hi-Tek Series 725 switches. Most keys use one-eye white linear switches. Space bar uses the same switch but bears a dab of paint or ink to denote a heavier spring. The lock keys have integrated LEDs; both use magenta lock switches, but ironically the num lock key has the LED placed outside of the switch (as the keycap is wider) making the use of a lock switch pointless. The caps lock switch does have the LED inside the switch. The LED for the num lock key is run through a hole in the plate in standard Hi-Tek fashion.

Gallery

The following example dates to 1987.

External links