XT/AT/PS2/Terminal to USB Converter with NKRO

WTF is that thing!!!

At a guess, there is...
CGND - case/shielding ground
S.P. - dunno, but possibly Signal Power? Solenoid Pulse? Why the dots when the other names don't use dots?
+12V - yup. Maybe just for a bell or solenoid? Or for an RS232 converter chip?
SGND - yup. Signal Ground, most likely.
KRXD - serial receive line.
KTXD - serial transmit line.

So, it has no clock signal. Just as RS232 seríal has no clock signal.

Not something my converter can cope with, I'm afraid!
Soarer
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Unread post22 Jul 2012, 21:00

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Hehe okidoki :D thanks for figuring it out!
I wonder if there is any way that could make the board useful, or a way to use the controller from another keyboard perhaps..
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Unread post24 Jul 2012, 14:17

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If you have a serial port, you could try wiring it to that (and a power supply for the 12V) and see if you can get anything to come up in hyperterminal. I would try and work out S.P. first though.

Sure, if it's not capacitive, then a controller swap would be a pretty sure-fire way to get it to work... and it wouldn't need the 12V then!
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Unread post24 Jul 2012, 14:44

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Question: I have an IBM board with the RJ-45 converter. To hook this up to the converter should I be purchasing one of these?

http://www.pjrc.com/store/wiz812_adaptor.html

Or would I be cutting the cord and putting the smaller wires in the breadboard? I am not that familiar with hobby electronics this is the most involved project I have worked on hardware wise.
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Unread post01 Aug 2012, 21:48

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Hoping folks can help. What is the expected behavior of using a SC with a Model F and hitting the print screen key?
My current behavior is that no matter what combo I hit I get an * instead of a print screen key press.

I found legacy.sc which seems to have an print screen macro but i am not quite sure how to insert the macro (if it is indeed needed).

My other problem is I can't seem to get scrd to work. I am on Mac OS X 10.7 and have even recompiled the tools. It runs but only ever dumps SC out. scinfo seems to connect and work fine. What could I be doing wrong?

Thanks.
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Trent wrote:Question: I have an IBM board with the RJ-45 converter. To hook this up to the converter should I be purchasing one of these?

http://www.pjrc.com/store/wiz812_adaptor.html

Nope... just something like this:

Image

Unfortunately they don't fit in a breadboard though; the pins are too close together. Sparkfun sell an RJ45 breakout board to adapt one to a breadboard friendly pin spacing.
Trent wrote:Or would I be cutting the cord and putting the smaller wires in the breadboard? I am not that familiar with hobby electronics this is the most involved project I have worked on hardware wise.

The trouble with that is that the flexible wires just bend when you try to push them in to the breadboard! You'd need to put some solder on them, or even better, solder them to some pins.

I can't think right now of a way for you to build it without soldering, which I'm guessing is what you're after...?
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Unread post02 Aug 2012, 00:44

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AltRN8 wrote:Hoping folks can help. What is the expected behavior of using a SC with a Model F and hitting the print screen key?
My current behavior is that no matter what combo I hit I get an * instead of a print screen key press.

I found legacy.sc which seems to have an print screen macro but i am not quite sure how to insert the macro (if it is indeed needed).

Yup, without legacy.sc compiled and loaded, * is just *. The two commands you need are:

Code: Select all
scas legacy.sc legacy.scb
scwr legacy.scb
The macro will put PrtSc on Ctrl-*, as it was on those keyboards.

AltRN8 wrote:My other problem is I can't seem to get scrd to work. I am on Mac OS X 10.7 and have even recompiled the tools. It runs but only ever dumps SC out. scinfo seems to connect and work fine. What could I be doing wrong?

Hmm, it probably is working then - it's just that there is no config in the converter to read out!
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Unread post02 Aug 2012, 00:57

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Is anyone here willing to build one of these for profit?
Or is building one myself not nearly as difficult as it seems?
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Unread post02 Aug 2012, 01:38

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Soarer thanks for the advice. I took a look at the link you suggested and bought the necessary adapters and hope to get them soon. Yes you are correct I was hoping to get a setup with the teensy++, breadboard and the RJ-45 adapter so I wouldn't have to do any soldering work. I am not afraid of doing soldering work, I just think it would be a cleaner project without it.

I am taking the guts of one of the RJ-45 (smaller body) and putting it in one of the older (larger body) silver tag frames. All of my silver tag 122 key boards had their cords cut, and the RJ-45 one was the only one with the cord left intact. I like the style and size of the older housing though. After the converter has been made and the RJ-45 board confirmed to be working I will be doing a full bolt mod to it to convert the key layout to ANSI. I wanted to confirm on a second note, I haven't looked at the documentation or individual key programming too extensively, but would this mod allow for the ISO -> ANSI conversion?

When all of the parts come together I'll begin working on the converter!
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Unread post02 Aug 2012, 04:45

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spolia_optima wrote:Is anyone here willing to build one of these for profit?
Or is building one myself not nearly as difficult as it seems?
Here's a step by step guide:
  • Buy a real Teensy board (or Teensy++ if you need macros on each and every key)
  • Download and install the Teensy Loader program
  • Download Soarer's converter .hex file
  • Plug in the Teensy, start TeensyLoader and select Soarer's hex file
  • Press the reset button on the Teensy and click "Load" in the program
You should now have a working converter. See Soarer's post above on how to load remappings.
JBert

Unread post02 Aug 2012, 08:39

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Thanks Soarer!

I actually figured it out right after I posted. I feel a little dense that I didn't get at first.
I didn't realize we weren't changing the base scan code translation but applying macros on top.
Actually a really great design, I just needed to RTM closer.

Thanks for the fast response. I really appreciate all the great work and support.
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Unread post02 Aug 2012, 19:52

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Trent wrote:... would this mod allow for the ISO -> ANSI conversion?

Sure does! It handles all of the codes produced by the 'extra' positions available on 84/101/102/122-key IBMs :D

JBert wrote:Here's a step by step guide:

Hey, you forgot to wire it up!

AltRN8 wrote:I didn't realize we weren't changing the base scan code translation but applying macros on top.

Heh, the macros are actually kind of mirroring what the 101-key keyboards do for those keys, which isn't something you'll find explained in my docs yet! :)
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Unread post03 Aug 2012, 00:27

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Soarer wrote:
Trent wrote:... would this mod allow for the ISO -> ANSI conversion?

Sure does! It handles all of the codes produced by the 'extra' positions available on 84/101/102/122-key IBMs :D

Awesome thanks very much. I ordered all of the parts for my converter! The only parts I will be missing are some extra pins for the RJ45 adapter I ordered but I think tipo33 can help me out with that.

One extra question: I found out on a forum that you could hook up a teensy++ to a rasberry pi if you added a 3.3v regulator on the back of the teensy. Have you tried to hook up a soarer converter to a rasberry pi and see if it would take input after being programmed? I am sure that it would work just fine since it is supported by linux but just wanted to ask if you had tried that. Sadly I realized this fact after I had submitted my teensy order and shipping on that little part would be insane.
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Unread post03 Aug 2012, 06:12

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I think you misunderstood that forum post. This also means that you will only supply the keyboard hooked to the converter with a measly 3.3V instead of 5V, I'm not sure if the keyboard will keep working at that voltage.

In the end, it might be easier to put a wall wart-powered USB hub between the converter and the Pi's USB port...
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Unread post03 Aug 2012, 07:58

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Ah I was wondering whether or not the keyboard would still be able to be powered with less than 5v. Going the USB hub route is certainly an ideal option.
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Unread post03 Aug 2012, 10:39

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Actually, I think the forum post is mistaken; a Teensy running at 5V should work fine with the Pi's USB port.

edit: was it this post? That reply could be assuming a serial connection to the Pi's GPIO pins, rather than USB.
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Unread post03 Aug 2012, 11:16

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Yeah it was that post. Ah a serial connection that makes sense.

And does this converter listen to BIOS scan codes or windows scan codes?
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Unread post04 Aug 2012, 00:28

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Hey, that's a trick question! No fair!

It's both, and neither! Typically the PS/2 port on a PC is configured to translate scan code set 2 into set 1, which is what the BIOS and Windows both see. But since 101/102-key keyboards use an extended version of set 2, this results in an extended version of set 1 - which isn't normally sent by any keyboard. The converter handles set 1, set 2, extended set 2, and set 3.
But not extended set 1 (although I have built a table that would do that if it was ever needed). :ugeek:
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Unread post04 Aug 2012, 01:14

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Soarer wrote:Hey, that's a trick question! No fair!

It's both, and neither! Typically the PS/2 port on a PC is configured to translate scan code set 2 into set 1, which is what the BIOS and Windows both see. But since 101/102-key keyboards use an extended version of set 2, this results in an extended version of set 1 - which isn't normally sent by any keyboard. The converter handles set 1, set 2, extended set 2, and set 3.
But not extended set 1 (although I have built a table that would do that if it was ever needed). :ugeek:

Ah clever. Well cool I look forward to making the converter! I am still waiting on parts for my RJ-45 adapter and some breadboard wires, but I will post the results soon. I am going to build the converter and first test if the RJ-45 board even works. If the board works then I am going to chop the RJ-45 cord down to about one foot then make attach a new RJ-45 adapter so that the teensy and all other components can fit inside of the board (with a USB B style adapter sitting on the outside). I'll also need to get some solderable wire and a small breadboard once it is done, as I will want to keep it embedded inside of the unit.
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Unread post06 Aug 2012, 12:12

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hm, reading this stuff makes me overthink the project I had planned (maybe you remember, Soarer) of wiring up a Terminal Board directly to the GPIO of the Raspberry pi. Connecting a teensy to the RaspPi using the UART (it was the UART afair) is an interesting idea. But maybe then a Teensy/ATMega32U4 is a little bit too much, and a cheaper microcontroller without USB would be sufficient.
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Unread post06 Aug 2012, 13:27

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Unicomp 122-Key Terminal Emulator - IBM Model M 1394309 - IBM Model M 1394312 (Terminal) - Cherry G84-4100 - Cherry G80-1800LUMDE-2 - Cherry G80-2551HAD (with a spare NIB)
RC-1140 wrote:hm, reading this stuff makes me overthink the project I had planned (maybe you remember, Soarer) of wiring up a Terminal Board directly to the GPIO of the Raspberry pi. Connecting a teensy to the RaspPi using the UART (it was the UART afair) is an interesting idea. But maybe then a Teensy/ATMega32U4 is a little bit too much, and a cheaper microcontroller without USB would be sufficient.

I think I said before that it sounded 'challenging'. Now it's sounding challenging and convoluted :lol:

Don't forget you'd need to use a separate programmer if you don't have USB on the microcontroller!
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Unread post07 Aug 2012, 17:53

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Ok so what am I doing wrong:

* Programmed the teensy with 1.02
* using a terminal style board with RJ-45 jack
* All of the pin assignments are correct with the diagram shown in the documentation.
* Hookup keyboard and then proceed to try a few normal "letter" keys and no input is shown.

I have not used any of the exes in the tools folder, I have simply flashed the 1286 firmware. When I try to do a scinfo with the tool it does not see anything.

Am I missing a step? Will I have to write a custom button configuration before doing anything further? I thought that the items in the tools folder were only for use with macros and not assigning keys in the layout. I'm a bit lost, and small electronics have never been my forte.

Edit: and while plugged in, half of the teensy decided to pull off of the breadboard I am using. I notice often that I hear the usb on/off toggling. Did I screw up the teensy? Because I can re-flash it no problem, which makes me think it is fine. And scboot seems to recognize the device right after I plug it in but no luck with the conversion of key clicks.

Edit 2: After plugging in the teensy device, I can run scinfo and scboot just fine and it will detect the device, but running scinfo or scboot multiple times, usually the 2nd time it says no soarer converter found.
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Unread post09 Aug 2012, 01:14

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I've tried a RJ-45 jack once for a 122key Model M and there was something else in the jack that prevented it from working. It worked fine after cutting both cables and soldering the connection directly. Maybe you should check the connections with a multimeter.
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Unread post09 Aug 2012, 08:56

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Trent wrote:Edit 2: After plugging in the teensy device, I can run scinfo and scboot just fine and it will detect the device, but running scinfo or scboot multiple times, usually the 2nd time it says no soarer converter found.
That's a known bug:
Soarer wrote:Unrelated, but I did find that using the scrd tool left the config interface inoperable, I must've broken it at some point :(
Simply unplug the Teensy from USB and it should work again.
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Unread post09 Aug 2012, 09:47

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Icarium I will try what you suggested. Jbert I noticed that does indeed help. I can't seem to notice any key presses that do anything. I tried to run the example.sc file to get it it programmed but it does not seem to work. After I document what pins are what color I'll try what Icarium did and hopefully that will work. I'll be poking them into the bread board and see what happens.
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Unread post09 Aug 2012, 10:37

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I haven't had that problem with scinfo, only with scrd. After running scboot you would need to click the 'run' button in the Teensy loader program, or replug the USB, but that's expected :D

Anyway, first things first... is the wiring definitely correct? The diagrams are looking into the front of the socket, and some people have been confused on that point.
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Unread post09 Aug 2012, 12:00

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Soarer wrote:I haven't had that problem with scinfo, only with scrd. After running scboot you would need to click the 'run' button in the Teensy loader program, or replug the USB, but that's expected :D

So the order would be:
1. Flash teensy
2. scas example.sc example.scb
2. scwr example.scb
3. scboot
4. hit button on teensy
5. see if QWERTY keys work?
Soarer wrote:Anyway, first things first... is the wiring definitely correct? The diagrams are looking into the front of the socket, and some people have been confused on that point.

This is the diagram I am following:
Image

This is the image I took of the connector I have (you will notice it is upside down):
Image

So according to those two images.
* I have no PE line
* GND is black
* Clock is red
* Data is yellow
* Vcc 5v is White
* There is some kind of silver line after data, unsure of purpose

They are wired into the breadboard like so:
Image

Commands:
Code: Select all
C:\Users\Admin\Desktop\soarer converter\exes>scinfo
scinfo: looking for Soarer's Converter: found
scinfo: sending info request: ok
device: ok

Protocol Version: v1.00
Code Version: v1.02
Max Settings Version: v1.01
Current Settings Version: v1.01
SRAM Size: 8192 bytes
SRAM Free: 6923 bytes
EEPROM Size: 4096 bytes
EEPROM Free: 3880 bytes

C:\Users\Admin\Desktop\soarer converter\exes>scas example.sc example.scb
No errors. Wrote: example.scb

C:\Users\Admin\Desktop\soarer converter\exes>scwr example.scb
scwr: looking for Soarer's Converter: found
scwr: reading file: 214 bytes: ok
scwr: sending info request: ok
device: ok
protocol version check: converter=1.00, scwr=1.00: ok
settings version check: converter=1.01, file=1.01: ok
settings length check: max=4090, file=212 bytes: ok
scwr: sending write request for 212 bytes: ok
device: ok
device: ready
scwr: sending 60 bytes: ok
device: ok
device: ready
scwr: sending 60 bytes: ok
device: ok
device: ready
scwr: sending 60 bytes: ok
device: ok
device: ready
scwr: sending 32 bytes: ok
device: ok
device: complete

C:\Users\Admin\Desktop\soarer converter\exes>scboot
scboot: looking for Soarer's Converter: found
scboot: sending boot request: ok
device: ok


*Hit teensy button*

*Try a couple different standard letter keys, no response*
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Unread post09 Aug 2012, 22:04

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Ouch, that's as I feared... backwards :(

The silver line is the shielding, which is PE. It doesn't need connecting (but if it is it should be to ground).

* Vcc 5v is black
* Data is red
* Clock is yellow
* GND is White
* (PE is silver line)

Just by flashing the Teensy most keys should work; the config is not required.
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Unread post09 Aug 2012, 22:42

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Soarer wrote:Ouch, that's as I feared... backwards :(

Image

Edit: after re-do of backward ass colors, I load up the teensy, reflash with Soarer_at2usb_v1.02_at90usb1286.hex -- reboot unit and attempt standard key-presses but fail to have any of the keys working.

:cry:
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Unread post09 Aug 2012, 23:06

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Strange choice of colours, for sure. Hardly matters though.

That they used pinouts that go so horribly wrong when reversed matters more :(
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Unread post10 Aug 2012, 00:37

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