Keyboard enthusiast age structure

When were you born?

2011-
1
0%
2006-2010
0
No votes
2001-2005
5
2%
1996-2000
32
13%
1991-1995
41
16%
1986-1990
47
19%
1981-1985
51
20%
1976-1980
26
10%
1971-1975
20
8%
1966-1970
17
7%
1961-1965
5
2%
1956-1960
4
2%
1951-1955
2
1%
0000-1950
1
0%
 
Total votes: 252

andrewjoy

15 Mar 2016, 11:56

Oh when 56k started to be a thing ! That was awesome! So fast!

User avatar
shreebles
Finally 60%

15 Mar 2016, 13:12

bricomaz wrote: anyway I think it will be interesting to understand what brings the younger ones into mechanical keyboards since I'm quite sure for us "differently young" (47 on next march 18th here...) nostalgia plays a significant role...or is it? I mean when I started with computers clacky keyboards were almost the *only* option.
When I started playing around with computers I believe rubber domes had just replaced real keyboards just about everywhere.
We found early that things that went clack were a bit more fun. At the office, my dad had a printing desk calculator, and an electrical typewriter (TA Gabriele).
Those were more fun than the normal keyboards on the Pentium I and II PCs, which were all rubber domes, mostly Cherry, I also remember the Highscreen brand logo on almost every other piece of technology my dad owned.
I got my first mech in 2011, a g80 1800 for a few bucks. The reason was that people on a computer forum were raving about mech keyboards and when I started looking at the diagrams and technology those keyboards featured I understood how such mechanisms could be superior than a worn out rubber dome. Before that time I was still typing on my brother's worn out Logitech Internet Navigator keyboard because it had media keys. He had just bought into the next level of rubberdome crap, a fancy G15 with a display. (Luckily, I converted him later, he switched to a G710+, MX Browns, and now uses a K70 RGB with Reds.)
Since the day I started typing on the G80, I found my suspicion that mechanical is better to be true, and gave up the media keys for the superior typing experience.

I feel that not everyone who loves mechanical keyboards does so out of nostalgia. I have a lot of respect for old keyboards that are built for the ages, like IBMs. But I never actually used them when they were the standard.
ohaimark wrote: Poll: how many people under 30 know what baud rate is without Googling it? Other than me, of course. ;)
I work in IT, I had to look at ancient technology as part of my training :D
I'm 25.

User avatar
Chyros

15 Mar 2016, 14:45

I remember being the only kid in school with a computer :p .

andrewjoy

15 Mar 2016, 15:14

Anyone who does none standard stuff over serial still knows what baud rate is :)

User avatar
keycap

15 Mar 2016, 15:32

Despite being born in the new millennium, I grew up with PCs from the '90s. I'm even fond of Windows 98SE and 56K dial-up. I'm pretty sure that my first keyboard was a Dell AT101W. I very well remember that Dell logo, but it certainly was not a Dell QuietKey, because it had that massive chassis. Maybe that's why I love Alps so much! :)

Around 10 years ago, it was given away because apparently it looked "too old" for the newer Compaq computer with Windows XP. What a shame... :(

User avatar
Chyros

15 Mar 2016, 16:04

keycap wrote: Despite being born in the new millennium, I grew up with PCs from the '90s. I'm even fond of Windows 98SE and 56K dial-up. I'm pretty sure that my first keyboard was a Dell AT101W. I very well remember that Dell logo, but it certainly was not a Dell QuietKey, because it had that massive chassis. Maybe that's why I love Alps so much! :)
Silitek did make AT101WR QuietKeys that looked just like normal AT101Ws, but they're much rarer than the omnipresent SKCM Black model :) .

User avatar
Brot

15 Mar 2016, 17:13

uhm, one person born in 2011 :D?

User avatar
ohaimark
Kingpin

15 Mar 2016, 17:23

Someone is teaching their child to read using "Keyboard ABCs" and the wiki. Don't judge!

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kbdfr
The Tiproman

15 Mar 2016, 17:30

I would say someone inadvertently entered their own mental age :lol:

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ohaimark
Kingpin

15 Mar 2016, 17:31

You're right. There's a certain allure to the Keyboard ABCs, though.

Alps, Beam Spring, Cherry, DeskThority... :D

User avatar
kbdfr
The Tiproman

15 Mar 2016, 17:36

ohaimark wrote: […] the Keyboard ABCs, though.

Alps, Beam Spring, Cherry, DeskThority... :D
:lol:

User avatar
Compgeke

15 Mar 2016, 19:41

Chyros wrote: I remember being the only kid in school with a computer :p .
I'm only 19 but for a while I was the only one in school with a computer. It wasn't until mid middle school computers started becoming a more popular household item around here (I took part in that, actually) and by high school everyone had one, whether home purchased or school loaner. Was a fun time being able to actually type assignments rather than hand write everything, hand writing long stuff always makes my shoulder hurt.

User avatar
DanielT
Un petit village gaulois d'Armorique…

16 Mar 2016, 18:37

1980 here, a good year :lol: I never kept my age a secret it's also im my profile. I think it's good to share your age, don't know why :lol:

User avatar
kbdfr
The Tiproman

18 Mar 2016, 07:35

Here's another interesting survey concerning DT:
off-topic-f10/deskthority-s-functionali ... 13293.html

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Prelim

18 Mar 2016, 10:28

'82 at it's finest :P

User avatar
kokokoy

18 Mar 2016, 11:56

DanielT wrote: 1980 here, a good year :lol: I never kept my age a secret it's also im my profile. I think it's good to share your age, don't know why :lol:
80 is the best! :D

Oh man I just remembered, back on my home country when I used to buy games in the 80s we go to a small retail store and you purchase it by picking from a list then paying (1) the no of floppy discs the game requires and (2) the act of copying the game per discs! :lol:

User avatar
Muirium
µ

18 Mar 2016, 15:58

1979: all my IBMs are younger than me!

Great year for culture as a whole. Apocalypse Now comes first to mind. And my excuse for not being a navel-gazing, pocket-watch carrying, ironic tattoo wearing "Millennial". If only by a season!

I was there for the 80s, too. But I was the big kid who made you shut up when you started up your bullshit about Sega being better than Nintendo.

Engicoder

18 Mar 2016, 16:17

Its a pretty nice bell curve except for those of us in the 1966-1970 bump. You know, free love and all that. :-)
Last edited by Engicoder on 18 Mar 2016, 16:30, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
Halvar

18 Mar 2016, 16:23

1966 to 1970: we are the home computer teen generation... :-)

Still looking for a keyboard older than me.

User avatar
seebart
Offtopicthority Instigator

18 Mar 2016, 16:37

Halvar wrote: 1966 to 1970: we are the home computer teen generation... :-)

Still looking for a keyboard older than me.
Well I have one that is at least as old but not older, quite a difficult task to find Halvar! ;)

photos-videos-f64/honeywell-micro-switc ... o%20switch

User avatar
Halvar

18 Mar 2016, 16:55

Yes, definitely. Some day ... I have seen yours, and it's probably older than me. So they exist... :-)

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Prelim

18 Mar 2016, 23:15

Halvar grampa!! ;)

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elecplus

19 Mar 2016, 00:38

Prelim wrote: Halvar grampa!! ;)
I would have thought more of us were grandparents :) I have 5 grandchildren, ages 2-8 years. They are such a joy, and I really like being able to spoil them a little, although their parents do plenty of that. Finances were a great hardship for us when my kids were small, but fortunately they all have good paying jobs, so their kids don't lack for anything.

User avatar
E3E

19 Mar 2016, 00:44

I fall into the second most populated range, 1986-1990. Looks like I got the tail end. I was born on the dawn of a new decade. :P

User avatar
E3E

19 Mar 2016, 00:50

Chyros wrote:
keycap wrote: Despite being born in the new millennium, I grew up with PCs from the '90s. I'm even fond of Windows 98SE and 56K dial-up. I'm pretty sure that my first keyboard was a Dell AT101W. I very well remember that Dell logo, but it certainly was not a Dell QuietKey, because it had that massive chassis. Maybe that's why I love Alps so much! :)
Silitek did make AT101WR QuietKeys that looked just like normal AT101Ws, but they're much rarer than the omnipresent SKCM Black model :) .
Saw a few of these pop up on eBay in the past month or so. Well, maybe one... or was it two? Who knows!

Ebay does.

Still, being rubberdome... Eeeeh. I hear people really like quietkeys, is that right? :)

EDIT: Whoops, nevermind. Those were AT101Rs without the modern bottom row. :D

User avatar
jou

19 Mar 2016, 00:59

Looks like I'm in the most common age group (1984 for me) and below the median. So I'm kind of disappointed that I can't count myself as "old fart"

User avatar
seebart
Offtopicthority Instigator

19 Mar 2016, 01:05

jou wrote: Looks like I'm in the most common age group (1984 for me) and below the median. So I'm kind of disappointed that I can't count myself as "old fart"
No but I can. :lol:

User avatar
Spikebolt
√(4) != -2

19 Mar 2016, 02:43

bricomaz wrote: Funny. I was thinking about making such a poll 2 days ago :) anyway I think it will be interesting to understand what brings the younger ones into mechanical keyboards since I'm quite sure for us "differently young" (47 on next march 18th here...) nostalgia plays a significant role...or is it? I mean when I started with computers clacky keyboards were almost the *only* option.
27 years old here! I actually can't remember any of the keyboards I used when I was a kid...

My first mechanical keyboard was actually a gaming keyboard with MX blues. At first I loved the keyboard but then I started to get annoyed with the sound, the software, the colors, everything. Fortunately the keyboard died and with the warranty money I bought a Filco with MX reds. That keyboard felt even better! This was the beginning of this very long and expensive road :lol:

I got hooked in getting to know the feeling of all (not literally) the different keyboards that are out there. I spend most time in my day writing on a keyboard, so it makes sense that I want to find out the best tool for my job, to find out the one I like the most. At least that's the excuse I tell myself :mrgreen:

It's not nostalgia that drives me it's the curiosity to discover new feelings.

bricomaz

19 Mar 2016, 16:39

shreebles wrote: I feel that not everyone who loves mechanical keyboards does so out of nostalgia. I have a lot of respect for old keyboards that are built for the ages, like IBMs. But I never actually used them when they were the standard.
Spikebolt wrote: I got hooked in getting to know the feeling of all (not literally) the different keyboards that are out there. I spend most time in my day writing on a keyboard, so it makes sense that I want to find out the best tool for my job, to find out the one I like the most. At least that's the excuse I tell myself :mrgreen:

It's not nostalgia that drives me it's the curiosity to discover new feelings.
Just to clarify: I wasn't saying that nostalgia is for everyone here a reason to get into mechanical keyboards. It was for me (and maybe others). As soon as i started type on my ducky with blue mx I had an immediate flashback ;) Spikebolt: I agree with you when you say you need the best tool for your job. I'm still deciding if I should get a Topre or a cherry mx brown keyboard to carry at my office... Sadly I couldn't try any of them back in the old days :lol:

User avatar
keycap

30 Mar 2016, 18:03

bricomaz wrote: anyway I think it will be interesting to understand what brings the younger ones into mechanical keyboards since I'm quite sure for us "differently young" (47 on next march 18th here...)
I became interested with mechanical keyboards by my never-ending interest of old computers. I guess that my interest sparked once I bought my first IBM Model M.. Then it became more of a big thing for me when I bought my first Alps board. Granted, it really hurts to be tempted with Blue Alps and Capacitive Buckling Springs, because I'm still a sophomore in high school and I have no money. But I will get them some day, I know I will :twisted:

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