Micronorth Keyboard

coolrainbow20

07 Nov 2020, 19:37

I recently bought a vintage keyboard. More information and photos here: https://www.reddit.com/r/MechanicalKeyb ... ntage_boy/

coolrainbow20

26 Nov 2020, 18:58

Can someone here help me in getting this to work with usb?

I heard that it might be possible to use a converter called "Soarer's converter" using some kind of teensy controller.
But since I don't know the pinout I can't know for sure. Is there a way to determine the pinout? Maybe I can even make my own converter to learn some soldering skills, since I have easy access to a teensy at an online store that exists in my home country.

kelvinhall05

26 Nov 2020, 19:23

coolrainbow20 wrote:
26 Nov 2020, 18:58
Can someone here help me in getting this to work with usb?

I heard that it might be possible to use a converter called "Soarer's converter" using some kind of teensy controller.
But since I don't know the pinout I can't know for sure. Is there a way to determine the pinout? Maybe I can even make my own converter to learn some soldering skills, since I have easy access to a teensy at an online store that exists in my home country.
If it speaks XT or AT, the pinout will be standard. You can always look inside at the PCB. Takes two seconds to find where each pin goes.

coolrainbow20

26 Nov 2020, 20:27

kelvinhall05 wrote:
26 Nov 2020, 19:23
coolrainbow20 wrote:
26 Nov 2020, 18:58
Can someone here help me in getting this to work with usb?

I heard that it might be possible to use a converter called "Soarer's converter" using some kind of teensy controller.
But since I don't know the pinout I can't know for sure. Is there a way to determine the pinout? Maybe I can even make my own converter to learn some soldering skills, since I have easy access to a teensy at an online store that exists in my home country.
If it speaks XT or AT, the pinout will be standard. You can always look inside at the PCB. Takes two seconds to find where each pin goes.
How do you know what each wire/pin does?
Do the colors of the wires tell you something.
In the link I've provided there is another link that shows some pics of the board and even some of the pcb inside, showing the cable pins.

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1TXZFrl ... sp=sharing
The big green and big black cable is for ground I think, because it's connected to the metal mounting plate.
The other ones aren't known to me.
Also the 6th wire (yellow) that is on the far right doesn't seem to be connected.

kelvinhall05

26 Nov 2020, 22:12

coolrainbow20 wrote:
26 Nov 2020, 20:27
kelvinhall05 wrote:
26 Nov 2020, 19:23
coolrainbow20 wrote:
26 Nov 2020, 18:58
Can someone here help me in getting this to work with usb?

I heard that it might be possible to use a converter called "Soarer's converter" using some kind of teensy controller.
But since I don't know the pinout I can't know for sure. Is there a way to determine the pinout? Maybe I can even make my own converter to learn some soldering skills, since I have easy access to a teensy at an online store that exists in my home country.
If it speaks XT or AT, the pinout will be standard. You can always look inside at the PCB. Takes two seconds to find where each pin goes.
How do you know what each wire/pin does?
Do the colors of the wires tell you something.
In the link I've provided there is another link that shows some pics of the board and even some of the pcb inside, showing the cable pins.

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1TXZFrl ... sp=sharing
The big green and big black cable is for ground I think, because it's connected to the metal mounting plate.
The other ones aren't known to me.
Also the 6th wire (yellow) that is on the far right doesn't seem to be connected.
Again, the pinout is probably standard (connector-side), but here on the PCB you would follow the traces and see where they go. VCC and ground are easy to figure out, if it has a reset line (likely will, as it is probably XT) it'll go to reset on the controller, and clock and data will go to IO pins on the controller (no way to differentiate those, but they can safely be swapped, just won't work one way).

Rayndalf

27 Nov 2020, 00:12

It looks like a Model F XT clone with Cherry keycaps (so it probably uses Cherry black switches and a Cherry PCB as well).

Something like this should work.
https://geekhack.org/index.php?topic=103648.0
If you convert it internally all you'd need is a pro micro and a cable.

User avatar
Polecat

27 Nov 2020, 01:38

coolrainbow20 wrote:
26 Nov 2020, 20:27

How do you know what each wire/pin does?
Do the colors of the wires tell you something.
In the link I've provided there is another link that shows some pics of the board and even some of the pcb inside, showing the cable pins.

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1TXZFrl ... sp=sharing
The big green and big black cable is for ground I think, because it's connected to the metal mounting plate.
The other ones aren't known to me.
Also the 6th wire (yellow) that is on the far right doesn't seem to be connected.
Is that the original cable? The reason I ask is that it has a 6 pin header plug pushed onto a 5 pin connector, with the yellow wire not used. And the ground/shield wire is spliced with a screw and nut. Four wires (plus ground/shield) is enough for an XT clone keyboard with no reset, but it seems unlikely it was made that way originally. You should not plug it in, to a computer or a converter, until you confirm that the +5 volt and ground connections are correct, because doing so could kill the controller or other components or the computer or converter itself. Hopefully that hasn't happened already. The wire colors mean nothing unless you have an identical cable to compare to from a known keyboard. There is no "standard" for that. You'll need an ohmmeter to trace out the pinout of the cable. On the PC board side you'll need to identify the Vcc (+5 volt) and ground pins on the controller IC and which pins on the header they are connected to, then follow them through the cable to see if they go to the correct pins on the DIN connector. The XT DIN5 pinout is attached
Attachments
xtatpinout.jpg
xtatpinout.jpg (24.02 KiB) Viewed 1351 times

User avatar
hellothere

27 Nov 2020, 02:29

kelvinhall05 wrote:
26 Nov 2020, 22:12
Again, the pinout is probably standard (connector-side), but here on the PCB you would follow the traces and see where they go. VCC and ground are easy to figure out, if it has a reset line (likely will, as it is probably XT) it'll go to reset on the controller, and clock and data will go to IO pins on the controller (no way to differentiate those, but they can safely be swapped, just won't work one way).
I finally have a multimeter and I figured out how to determine GND -- well, I was able to at least once. I still have no idea how you determine VCC.

There's a "light" version of the instructions for Hasu's converter at http://octobrain.net/blog/howto-revive- ... board.html. I was playing around with that a bit today. There's a "light" version of how to build a Soarer's Converter at viewtopic.php?t=19035. That might be your best bet if you're talking "probably XT protocol." Hey, I was able to follow the instructions. I also added some new links in that thread, so if you need to buy stuff, it's just a click away.

If you just want to buy a Soarer's Converter and hope for the best, you can just search ebay for them. The only difference between the ones on ebay and the ones you make yourself is that the ebay ones look nicer.

kelvinhall05

27 Nov 2020, 02:53

hellothere wrote:
27 Nov 2020, 02:29
kelvinhall05 wrote:
26 Nov 2020, 22:12
Again, the pinout is probably standard (connector-side), but here on the PCB you would follow the traces and see where they go. VCC and ground are easy to figure out, if it has a reset line (likely will, as it is probably XT) it'll go to reset on the controller, and clock and data will go to IO pins on the controller (no way to differentiate those, but they can safely be swapped, just won't work one way).
I finally have a multimeter and I figured out how to determine GND -- well, I was able to at least once. I still have no idea how you determine VCC.

There's a "light" version of the instructions for Hasu's converter at http://octobrain.net/blog/howto-revive- ... board.html. I was playing around with that a bit today. There's a "light" version of how to build a Soarer's Converter at viewtopic.php?t=19035. That might be your best bet if you're talking "probably XT protocol." Hey, I was able to follow the instructions. I also added some new links in that thread, so if you need to buy stuff, it's just a click away.

If you just want to buy a Soarer's Converter and hope for the best, you can just search ebay for them. The only difference between the ones on ebay and the ones you make yourself is that the ebay ones look nicer.
VCC goes to VCC on any of the chips on the board, will also have caps between it and ground, and will likely be the only other thick trace on the board (depending on what keyboard you have).

User avatar
hellothere

27 Nov 2020, 03:14

kelvinhall05 wrote:
27 Nov 2020, 02:53
VCC goes to VCC on any of the chips on the board ...
So ... to determine VCC, you'd have to know where VCC is. Hellothere has encountered an error. Please reboot your Hellothere.
It will also have caps between it and ground, and will likely be the only other thick trace on the board (depending on what keyboard you have).
THAT'S what I've been looking for! Thanks very much!

Thing #1: As mentioned, I finally got a multimeter and I was able to determine where ground was. However, I didn't need to do that. Using the "thick trace" as a guide, I looked at the trace that goes from pin #6 on my board. It goes directly to a screw hole and that's it. That's a ground.

Thing #2: the PCB has all of 5 caps on it. There's one "thick trace" that goes from a pin and touches two caps. That's pin #1. VCC!

Now, I need to figure out what all the other pins do. If you've got any pointers, please share!

kelvinhall05

27 Nov 2020, 03:17

hellothere wrote:
27 Nov 2020, 03:14
kelvinhall05 wrote:
27 Nov 2020, 02:53
VCC goes to VCC on any of the chips on the board ...
So ... to determine VCC, you'd have to know where VCC is. Hellothere has encountered an error. Please reboot your Hellothere.
It will also have caps between it and ground, and will likely be the only other thick trace on the board (depending on what keyboard you have).
THAT'S what I've been looking for! Thanks very much!

Thing #1: As mentioned, I finally got a multimeter and I was able to determine where ground was. However, I didn't need to do that. Using the "thick trace" as a guide, I looked at the trace that goes from pin #6 on my board. It goes directly to a screw hole and that's it. That's a ground.

Thing #2: the PCB has all of 5 caps on it. There's one "thick trace" that goes from a pin and touches two caps. That's pin #1. VCC!

Now, I need to figure out what all the other pins do. If you've got any pointers, please share!
You check the datasheets for the chips, but it's almost always one of the corner pins. If you can figure out where ground is, you can usually guess VCC.

Can you please send pics of the PCB and all the chips on it, preferably marking their orientation on the side with the traces on it.

EDIT: If it has a reset line, it'll go to reset on the largest chip. Again, check datasheet. Clock and data will go to IO pins. No way of knowing which is which without guessing and testing both possiblities.

coolrainbow20

28 Nov 2020, 22:37

Thanks for all the answers!

I will upload some detailed photos of the pcb soon.

User avatar
hellothere

29 Nov 2020, 16:47

kelvinhall05 wrote:
27 Nov 2020, 03:17
hellothere wrote:
27 Nov 2020, 03:14
kelvinhall05 wrote:
27 Nov 2020, 02:53
VCC goes to VCC on any of the chips on the board ...
So ... to determine VCC, you'd have to know where VCC is. Hellothere has encountered an error. Please reboot your Hellothere.
It will also have caps between it and ground, and will likely be the only other thick trace on the board (depending on what keyboard you have).
THAT'S what I've been looking for! Thanks very much!

Thing #1: As mentioned, I finally got a multimeter and I was able to determine where ground was. However, I didn't need to do that. Using the "thick trace" as a guide, I looked at the trace that goes from pin #6 on my board. It goes directly to a screw hole and that's it. That's a ground.

Thing #2: the PCB has all of 5 caps on it. There's one "thick trace" that goes from a pin and touches two caps. That's pin #1. VCC!

Now, I need to figure out what all the other pins do. If you've got any pointers, please share!
You check the datasheets for the chips, but it's almost always one of the corner pins. If you can figure out where ground is, you can usually guess VCC.

Can you please send pics of the PCB and all the chips on it, preferably marking their orientation on the side with the traces on it.

EDIT: If it has a reset line, it'll go to reset on the largest chip. Again, check datasheet. Clock and data will go to IO pins. No way of knowing which is which without guessing and testing both possiblities.
I'm not meaning to hijack the thread, but here's my PCB. It's very minimalistic. Thanks for looking!
Spoiler:
IMG_1290 (2).JPG
IMG_1290 (2).JPG (1.49 MiB) Viewed 1174 times
IMG_1290 (2).JPG
IMG_1290 (2).JPG (1.49 MiB) Viewed 1174 times
IMG_1289 (2).JPG
IMG_1289 (2).JPG (1.28 MiB) Viewed 1174 times
IMG_1288 (2).JPG
IMG_1288 (2).JPG (1.32 MiB) Viewed 1174 times
IMG_1287 (2).JPG
IMG_1287 (2).JPG (1012.38 KiB) Viewed 1174 times
IMG_1286 (2).JPG
IMG_1286 (2).JPG (1.04 MiB) Viewed 1174 times
IMG_1285 (2).JPG
IMG_1285 (2).JPG (1.14 MiB) Viewed 1174 times

kelvinhall05

29 Nov 2020, 18:44

hellothere wrote:
29 Nov 2020, 16:47
kelvinhall05 wrote:
27 Nov 2020, 03:17
hellothere wrote:
27 Nov 2020, 03:14

So ... to determine VCC, you'd have to know where VCC is. Hellothere has encountered an error. Please reboot your Hellothere.


THAT'S what I've been looking for! Thanks very much!

Thing #1: As mentioned, I finally got a multimeter and I was able to determine where ground was. However, I didn't need to do that. Using the "thick trace" as a guide, I looked at the trace that goes from pin #6 on my board. It goes directly to a screw hole and that's it. That's a ground.

Thing #2: the PCB has all of 5 caps on it. There's one "thick trace" that goes from a pin and touches two caps. That's pin #1. VCC!

Now, I need to figure out what all the other pins do. If you've got any pointers, please share!
You check the datasheets for the chips, but it's almost always one of the corner pins. If you can figure out where ground is, you can usually guess VCC.

Can you please send pics of the PCB and all the chips on it, preferably marking their orientation on the side with the traces on it.

EDIT: If it has a reset line, it'll go to reset on the largest chip. Again, check datasheet. Clock and data will go to IO pins. No way of knowing which is which without guessing and testing both possiblities.
I'm not meaning to hijack the thread, but here's my PCB. It's very minimalistic. Thanks for looking!
Spoiler:
IMG_1290 (2).JPG
IMG_1290 (2).JPG
IMG_1289 (2).JPG
IMG_1288 (2).JPG
IMG_1287 (2).JPG
IMG_1286 (2).JPG
IMG_1285 (2).JPG
On the connector, pins 1 and 6 are ground, 5 is VCC, and 2-4 appear to all be tied together. I'm guessing this thing speaks some sort of fucked-up serial protocol or something, I dunno. What board is this PCB from?

User avatar
hellothere

29 Nov 2020, 19:40

First, thanks for the response!

Second, this is my Cumulus yellow Alps terminal keyboard I bought from redmaus. I haven't been able to find another like it.
Spoiler:
2020-11-29_11h36_51.png
2020-11-29_11h36_51.png (710.78 KiB) Viewed 1131 times

kelvinhall05

29 Nov 2020, 20:41

hellothere wrote:
29 Nov 2020, 19:40
First, thanks for the response!

Second, this is my Cumulus yellow Alps terminal keyboard I bought from redmaus. I haven't been able to find another like it.
Spoiler:
2020-11-29_11h36_51.png
Honestly I'd just map the matrix unless you have the tools and experience to reverse engineer what is, again, probably some fucked serial protocol.

User avatar
hellothere

30 Nov 2020, 02:34

kelvinhall05 wrote:
29 Nov 2020, 20:41
hellothere wrote:
29 Nov 2020, 19:40
First, thanks for the response!

Second, this is my Cumulus yellow Alps terminal keyboard I bought from redmaus. I haven't been able to find another like it.
Spoiler:
2020-11-29_11h36_51.png
Honestly I'd just map the matrix unless you have the tools and experience to reverse engineer what is, again, probably some fucked serial protocol.
Only the tools and experience to get into a lot of trouble :D.

I looked over a couple of Arduino sites that talk about mapping small keyboard matrices. I think I'll wait on that. I've got a few keyboards that are much easier to revive.

coolrainbow20

06 Dec 2020, 20:56

coolrainbow20 wrote:
28 Nov 2020, 22:37
Thanks for all the answers!

I will upload some detailed photos of the pcb soon.
I've finally uploaded the photos here: https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/ ... sp=sharing

PCB Topside, PCB Underside and PCB Combined are the files named.

PS: I plugged it in my computer once using a passive at/ps2 adapter, is that bad? It didn't work, since it either doesn't work over ps/2 or might be damaged or both. I also see that one capacitor seems to be broken/leaked (the black cylinder one in the middle labeled C4).
I know that capacitors, specifically old ones seem to be dead often times and can cause problems.

kelvinhall05

06 Dec 2020, 21:53

coolrainbow20 wrote:
06 Dec 2020, 20:56
coolrainbow20 wrote:
28 Nov 2020, 22:37
Thanks for all the answers!

I will upload some detailed photos of the pcb soon.
I've finally uploaded the photos here: https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/ ... sp=sharing

PCB Topside, PCB Underside and PCB Combined are the files named.

PS: I plugged it in my computer once using a passive at/ps2 adapter, is that bad? It didn't work, since it either doesn't work over ps/2 or might be damaged or both. I also see that one capacitor seems to be broken/leaked (the black cylinder one in the middle labeled C4).
I know that capacitors, specifically old ones seem to be dead often times and can cause problems.
This just looks like a standard xt board that probably speaks xt. No wonder it didn't work over ps2 with a passive adapter lol. Make a Soarers with a pro micro and it should work flawlessly.

coolrainbow20

08 Dec 2020, 20:24

kelvinhall05 wrote:
06 Dec 2020, 21:53
coolrainbow20 wrote:
06 Dec 2020, 20:56
coolrainbow20 wrote:
28 Nov 2020, 22:37
Thanks for all the answers!

I will upload some detailed photos of the pcb soon.
I've finally uploaded the photos here: https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/ ... sp=sharing

PCB Topside, PCB Underside and PCB Combined are the files named.

PS: I plugged it in my computer once using a passive at/ps2 adapter, is that bad? It didn't work, since it either doesn't work over ps/2 or might be damaged or both. I also see that one capacitor seems to be broken/leaked (the black cylinder one in the middle labeled C4).
I know that capacitors, specifically old ones seem to be dead often times and can cause problems.
This just looks like a standard xt board that probably speaks xt. No wonder it didn't work over ps2 with a passive adapter lol. Make a Soarers with a pro micro and it should work flawlessly.
How do I get started? Is there a guide available on what I need aside from a Pro Micro and which steps I need to do, in order to get that board up and running?

Also, which Pro Micro do I need? The one with 5V/16Mhz or the one with 3.3V/8Mhz?

kelvinhall05

08 Dec 2020, 21:10

coolrainbow20 wrote:
08 Dec 2020, 20:24
kelvinhall05 wrote:
06 Dec 2020, 21:53
coolrainbow20 wrote:
06 Dec 2020, 20:56


I've finally uploaded the photos here: https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/ ... sp=sharing

PCB Topside, PCB Underside and PCB Combined are the files named.

PS: I plugged it in my computer once using a passive at/ps2 adapter, is that bad? It didn't work, since it either doesn't work over ps/2 or might be damaged or both. I also see that one capacitor seems to be broken/leaked (the black cylinder one in the middle labeled C4).
I know that capacitors, specifically old ones seem to be dead often times and can cause problems.
This just looks like a standard xt board that probably speaks xt. No wonder it didn't work over ps2 with a passive adapter lol. Make a Soarers with a pro micro and it should work flawlessly.
How do I get started? Is there a guide available on what I need aside from a Pro Micro and which steps I need to do, in order to get that board up and running?

Also, which Pro Micro do I need? The one with 5V/16Mhz or the one with 3.3V/8Mhz?
5v/16MHz, follow this guide:
soarerspromicro.pdf
(258.48 KiB) Downloaded 16 times

coolrainbow20

09 Dec 2020, 17:38

kelvinhall05 wrote:
08 Dec 2020, 21:10
coolrainbow20 wrote:
08 Dec 2020, 20:24
kelvinhall05 wrote:
06 Dec 2020, 21:53


This just looks like a standard xt board that probably speaks xt. No wonder it didn't work over ps2 with a passive adapter lol. Make a Soarers with a pro micro and it should work flawlessly.
How do I get started? Is there a guide available on what I need aside from a Pro Micro and which steps I need to do, in order to get that board up and running?

Also, which Pro Micro do I need? The one with 5V/16Mhz or the one with 3.3V/8Mhz?
5v/16MHz, follow this guide:
soarerspromicro.pdf
Ok, these Instructions are for Linux. But I'm on Windows. Are there any instructions on how to do that on Windows?
Also, is the firmware powered by TMK/QMK? Is it compatible with the qmk configurator / qmk toolbox? Because there exists a specific layout called "converter/xt", which looks exactly like my xt layout.

kelvinhall05

09 Dec 2020, 20:26

coolrainbow20 wrote:
09 Dec 2020, 17:38
kelvinhall05 wrote:
08 Dec 2020, 21:10
coolrainbow20 wrote:
08 Dec 2020, 20:24


How do I get started? Is there a guide available on what I need aside from a Pro Micro and which steps I need to do, in order to get that board up and running?

Also, which Pro Micro do I need? The one with 5V/16Mhz or the one with 3.3V/8Mhz?
5v/16MHz, follow this guide:
soarerspromicro.pdf
Ok, these Instructions are for Linux. But I'm on Windows. Are there any instructions on how to do that on Windows?
Also, is the firmware powered by TMK/QMK? Is it compatible with the qmk configurator / qmk toolbox? Because there exists a specific layout called "converter/xt", which looks exactly like my xt layout.
The only instructions here that are Linux specific is the flashing. Build the converter as instructed in the PDF and then figure out how to flash a .hex on Windows using some convoluted GUI that is way more confusing than just running one command :roll:

The firmware is Soarers, it is not at all related to TMK, and it's not compatible with the QMK configurator. You can try TMK but I find Soarers to be a simpler solution for basic XT stuff. You can always remap keys if you want.

coolrainbow20

26 Dec 2020, 20:16

I finally got a Pro Micro. Now I want to know what wires can I use. Also I want to know if I can attach the wires in a way to make the Pro Micro pluggable, so I can potential use other keyboards without (de-)soldering of the Pro Micro.

User avatar
hellothere

27 Dec 2020, 17:30

> I want to know if I can attach the wires in a way to make the Pro Micro pluggable, so I can potential use other keyboards without (de-)soldering of the Pro Micro.
Ah. Extra customization.

Well, the best version would probably have been
this. Note that orihalcon generally has some interesting stuff for sale and I'm sure he'll have more adapters.

Female to male Dupont wires are awesome. You can use the female connectors for where the cable connects to the keyboard, if you can figure that out with a multimeter. It's then pretty easy to solder the male ends to the appropriate connections on the Pro Micro, which will almost definitely be VCC, GND, 2, and 3. "Almost definitely" because I'm not looking at the pinout, ATM. On the RJ-45 version of the Model M, black is VCC, white is GND, red is data (2), and yellow is clock (3).

Note that the micro USB port on the Pro Micro is very fragile.

I've almost always used this guide for building a Soarer's. I've only built them for Models M and Models F. I might have done 4 or 5, now. The start-up cost, which is to buy a soldering iron, cables, electrical tape, and a Pro Micro was somewhat high, but I've paid that cost off through making the four or five converters, rather than buying orihalcon's converters. His are much nicer looking, though :D.

coolrainbow20

28 Dec 2020, 21:44

Can I somehow make an external converter?
I have two AT to PS/2 adapters. Maybe I could connect the Dupont wires to the PS/2 male port and make it an external pluggable converter this way.

Also: Is the Pinout for XT the same as for AT? If so, the pinout for PS/2 on an AT to PS/2 passive adapter would be the same as with an AT Keyboard that is plugged into an AT to PS/2 passive adapter, right?

User avatar
hellothere

28 Dec 2020, 23:01

coolrainbow20 wrote:
28 Dec 2020, 21:44
Can I somehow make an external converter?
I have two AT to PS/2 adapters. Maybe I could connect the Dupont wires to the PS/2 male port and make it an external pluggable converter this way.
Yes, but probably the better way of doing it would be ...

End of your keyboard cable (male 5pin DIN) -> new female 5pin DIN -> Pro Micro -> micro USB cable -> computer

You can get the female adapters with or without cables. Just don't confuse your cables/cable colors.

============

I was thinking about XT and AT pinouts and realized I didn't remember if the pinout is the same because I generally use ...

End of AT keyboard cable (male 5pinDIN) -> Female 5Pin DIN to PS/2 male adapter -> PS/2 female to USB active adapter

... but I checked the image above and http://www.kbdbabel.org/conn/index.html. Mirror images, which is what KBDbabel uses.

coolrainbow20

30 Dec 2020, 12:16

hellothere wrote:
28 Dec 2020, 23:01
... but I checked the image above and http://www.kbdbabel.org/conn/index.html. Mirror images, which is what KBDbabel uses.
I know why it is mirrored. The image in this thread shows the male connector of the cable, while the images in the link show the female port at the computer where the cable plugs in. So the pinout seems to be the exactly the same.

User avatar
hellothere

30 Dec 2020, 15:39

coolrainbow20 wrote:
30 Dec 2020, 12:16
hellothere wrote:
28 Dec 2020, 23:01
... but I checked the image above and http://www.kbdbabel.org/conn/index.html. Mirror images, which is what KBDbabel uses.
I know why it is mirrored. The image in this thread shows the male connector of the cable, while the images in the link show the female port at the computer where the cable plugs in. So the pinout seems to be the exactly the same.
Correct!

coolrainbow20

02 Jan 2021, 19:15

Does anyone know if the converter also support the numlock and capslock led? And how do I need to wire it up then?

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