Fujitsu Limited N860-2505-T00201A

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seebart
Offtopicthority Instigator

08 May 2016, 16:18

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I've had this for ages and never did a thread on it although it's pretty interesting. The bottom part of case is metal and the top part grey part around the keys is thick plastic. The keyboard is quite low in profile which in turn is only possible due to the unusual constuction of the Fujitsu Leafspring 3rd generation switch.
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The way the the Fujitsu Leafspring 3rd generation switch is designed vs. other switches like Alps SKCM for example is pretty unusual with individual barrels attached to a metal plate, leaf spring and button spring attached to PCB below the plate. The slider is separate from the barrel and the keycap. It does not use rubber gaskets/stoppers in the switches. The black bottom part of the white snap-in slider snaps into those holes on the metal plate so that the slider sits on top of the leaf which is very effortless in keypress.
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The result is a super smooth feel since there are no parts sliding against one another on key press, only the bottom part of the white snap-in slider pressing down the metal leaf . The whole mechanism is very low in profile.The click is extremely weak and faint, almost unnotiable.
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When pulling a keycap it's very possible to accidentally pull the snap-in-slider with the attached bottom part off also, not a real problem here since one cannot destroy anything. Worst thing that could happen is bending the leaf I guess.
The "tombstone" keycaps are very thick and sit quite firmly on the white snap-in sliders.
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While searching pictures online I stumbled upon this very interesting page that I had not seen before:

http://www.geocities.jp/development_room/fkb_stock.htm
Last edited by seebart on 01 Sep 2016, 01:24, edited 2 times in total.

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derzemel

08 May 2016, 16:26

soo... are those keycaps carved on a CNC? :P

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seebart
Offtopicthority Instigator

08 May 2016, 17:18

This keyboard was part of the Fujitsu FM 11 AD Professional Computer:

http://www.old-computers.com/museum/computer.asp?c=1217

Source: OLD-COMPUTERS.COM
The FM-11 was announced as a higher-end model of the FM-8 in November 1982, simultaneously with the mass market FM-7 machine. The FM-11 series was intended to be used in offices. FM stands for "Fujitsu Micro". The FM-11AD was released as the same time as the FM-11EX and FM-11ST. The FM-11ST is a cut-down version of the FM-11AD: F-Basic built-in ROM and no floppy disk drives on standard model.

Japanese characters can be displayed within a 16 x 16 pixels matrix. Chinese characters (JIS level 1 kanji) ROM available as an option offers: JIS level 1 2965 characters, JIS non-kanji 453 characters.

The FM-11AD later evolved into FM-11AD2 and FM-11AD2+. Based on a Motorola 6809 processor it became quite popular in Japan as a Flex (operating system available for the 6809 based computers) system.

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Contributors: Jiro Kita

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